AGE-WELL News blog

WELL | Sensor systems for the smart home

(French)

Mobility and reminiscence problems are among the commonest challenges experienced by Mary Huang, an engineer and MBA who has taken care of her getting old mother and father for several years.

Mary Huang

Peter, 90, who has vascular dementia and Alzheimer's illness, and her mother Anna, 86, who suffers from vascular dementia, congestive coronary heart failure and has had six falls in the final six months.

“Huang, who's hoping to find a new era of AGE-WELL Nationwide Innovation Hub referred to as Sensors and Analytics for Monitoring Mobility and Reminiscence (SAM3) . It opened in Ottawa in November 2017 to deal with mobility and memory challenges among older individuals.

A collaboration between AGE-WELL and Bruyère Research Institute and Carleton University, SAM3 features an condo laboratory situated at Elizabeth Bruyère Hospital and a design, improvement and check website at Carleton. The hub brings together health professionals, researchers, business, non-profits, older individuals and caregivers to develop smart home systems and different technologies that maintain seniors healthy, protected and unbiased as attainable.

Dr. Frank Knoefel (left) and Dr. Bruce Wallace with a pressure-sensitive mattress designed to monitor an older adult's health during sleep.

Dr. Frank Knoefel (left) and Dr. Bruce Wallace with a pressure-sensitive mattress designed to watch an older adult's health throughout sleep.

“As people age, many develop health problems,” says Dr. Frank Knoefel, a physician in the Bruyère Reminiscence Program at Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital and senior investigator at Bruyère Research Institute. The event of SAM3s is a vital a part of the economics of off-the-shelf gear. It's all about aging-in-place.

It can be as simple as a sensor positioned on a range to point that a pot has boiled dry. Different sensor systems may be seen in the toilet or understand wandering behaviors (see article under). Strain-sensitive mats beneath a mattress mattress can monitor how much someone moves during sleep. The thought is to immediate motion to help avoid strain, a big concern for individuals who cannot easily change positions. Sensor mats can even present whether a person is unstable when rising from the mattress.

Different units are being developed with the assist of their cognitive talents, based mostly on their completion of day by day activities and their capability to make use of everyday objects.

“It covers the whole spectrum,” says Dr. Rafik Goubran, a professor of engineering and vice-president, Analysis and Worldwide, at Carleton. “We’re integrating many sensors together with reasonable options to real issues. With the knowledge coming from these non-invasive sensors, will probably be potential

Dr. Helen Tang, who attended the SAM3 launch, tries out a “smart” mat.

Dr. Bruce Wallace, government director of SAM3 and an adjunct professor of pc and systems engineering at Carleton, says the analysis has already expanded from the dwelling laboratory at Bruyère to making an attempt out systems in individuals's houses. It also includes group companions similar to the Perley and Rideau Veterans' Health Middle and the Champlain Native Health Integration Network, IBM, Telus and Aerial Applied sciences in Montreal.

He stated that he was the new CEO and chief scientific officer at the Bruyère Research Institute. “Issues around privacy and the collection of data are getting careful consideration,” she notes.

For her part, Huang says she hopes the new sensor applied sciences will maintain her mother and father at home, given the benefits they get there, and more. “We need solutions that are high quality, reliable and do not break the bank,” she says. “There's a lot of challenges ahead, but we are making progress.”

Night time Wandering
Night time-time wandering is a standard and worrying drawback for individuals with dementia, placing them in danger for injury-even dying in the event that they depart home and sleep disruptions for their families and caregivers.

Two research tasks supported by AGE-WELL use sensors, particular lighting and prompts to detect individuals's movements once they get away from bed and encourage them to return to sleep.

“People need some cognitive assistance late at night,” says Dr. Hélène Pigot, a computer science professor at the Université de Sherbrooke. She is building a platform of sensors and prompts that lets you choose the best choice.

“Okay Mum, everyone is sleeping,” says Dr. Pigot. Some individuals want anonymous voices or music, she provides.

Dr. Bruce Wallace, a Carleton University adjunct professor who is government director at AGE-WELL's SAM3 innovation hub, has arrange a system that features bed sensors to comply with a person's night-time patterns. If wandering is detected, different technologies are activated-a night time mild activates, a voice message is performed and eventually the caregiver is alerted, if essential.

“We want to guide the person with dementia back to bed if we can,” Dr. Wallace explains. “This gives the caregiver a sense of security by only waking them with the efforts to leave home.”

Sensor systems for the smart home

Reminiscence and mobility issues are amongst the commonest issues skilled by older individuals; a reality that isn’t resistant to Mary Huang, an engineer and MBA who has been caring for her getting old mother and father for a few years.

Mary Huang

Mary Huang

This Ottawa resident stopped touring and then left work to care for her father, Peter, 90, who has vascular dementia and Alzheimer's, and his mother, Anna, age 86, who has vascular dementia, congestive coronary heart failure and six falls in the final six months.

“I do not sleep well these days,” says Huang, who hopes to seek out aid soon in the broad vary of latest applied sciences developed by AGE-WELL National Innovation Middle referred to as Sensors and Analytics for Monitoring Mobility. and Reminiscence (SAM3), or “Sensors and Mobility Tracking Analytics”. It opened in Ottawa in November 2017 to deal with mobility and memory issues among seniors.

A collaboration between AGE-WELL, the Bruyère Research Institute and Carleton College, the SAM3 Middle gives a laboratory-apartment resembling a typical house situated at the Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital, in addition to a design and improvement website. and check at Carleton University. This middle brings collectively health professionals, researchers, industrial sectors, non-profit organizations, seniors and caregivers to develop home automation systems and other technologies that allow seniors to be as wholesome, protected and unbiased as attainable.

Dr. Frank Knoefel (left) and Bruce Wallace present a pressure-sensitive mattress designed to monitor a senior's health while asleep.

Dr. Frank Knoefel (left) and Bruce Wallace present a pressure-sensitive mattress designed to watch a senior's health whereas asleep.

“As people get older, many develop health problems, as well as cognitive capacity and mobility challenges,” says Dr. Frank Knoefel, a doctor in the Memory Program at Elizabeth's Hospital. Bruyère and senior researcher at the Bruyère Analysis Institute. The know-how solutions developed at the SAM3 Middle utilize cost-effective business gear corresponding to sensors that, when tailored and enhanced, can present essential info to households and health professionals. All this aims to help getting older at home.

It can be so simple as a sensor placed on a range to indicate that a pan continues to warmth empty. Other sensor systems can illuminate the path to the rest room or perceive nocturnal wandering behaviors (see article under). Strain-sensitive mats beneath a mattress can monitor an individual's actions throughout sleep. We will act shortly to help forestall mattress sores, an essential concern for people who are unable to vary positions simply. Sensor mats may also point out if a person is unstable when getting up from the bed.

Other units are being developed to watch and predict the state of an individual's cognitive talents, depending on their every day activities and their capacity to make use of on a regular basis objects.

“The research covers the entire spectrum,” says Rafik Goubran, professor of engineering and vice-president of research and international relations at Carleton College. “We integrate many sensors to seek out sensible options to real problems. Knowledge from these non-invasive sensors will sign any indication of the presence of issues in older adults earlier than the state of affairs worsens. “

Helen Tang, who attended the launch of the SAM3 middle, is making an attempt a “smart” carpet.

Bruce Wallace, Government Director of the SAM3 Middle and Adjunct Professor of Pc and Systemic Engineering at Carleton University, says the analysis has already grown from a “living laboratory” in Bruyère to testing systems in individuals's houses. It also makes use of group companions resembling the Perley and Rideau Veterans Health Middle and the Champlain Native Well being Integration Network, in addition to business companions reminiscent of IBM, Telus and Aerial Technologies. from Montreal.

Refined SAM3 Middle systems will contribute to high quality of life while creating financial benefits, says Heidi Sveistrup, Chief Government Officer and Appearing Scientific Director at the Bruyère Analysis Institute. “The issues of privacy and data collection are under scrutiny,” she notes.

For her half, Ms. Huang hopes that new sensor applied sciences will enable seniors and her mother and father to stay at home, given the advantages they derive from it, as well as the excessive value of personal retirement houses and the availability of restricted long-term care. “We need high quality, reliable and affordable solutions,” she says. “Many challenges await us, but we are making progress. ” '

Wandering at night time
Night time-time wandering is a standard and troubling drawback for individuals with dementia, who put them susceptible to damage, and even dying in the event that they depart home, and trigger sleep disturbances for their households and caregivers.

Two analysis tasks supported by AGE-WELL use sensors, special lighting and messages to detect individuals's movements once they get away from bed and to encourage them to return.

“People need cognitive help late at night,” says Hélène Pigot, professor of pc science at the Université de Sherbrooke. It builds a sensor platform and messages that permit relations or care companions to choose the best choice.

“It could be a recording of the girl's voice saying,” Good mom, everyone sleeps, you’ll be able to return to bed now, “says Pigot. She provides that some individuals favor messages with anonymous voices or music.

Bruce Wallace, an assistant professor at Carleton College and common supervisor of AGE-WELL's SAM3 Innovation Middle, has carried out a system that features bed sensors to trace an individual's nocturnal habits. If we detect a person's wandering, other applied sciences are activated: an evening mild comes on, a voice message is heard and, finally, the caregiver is alerted, if crucial.

“We want to help the person with dementia to go back to bed if we can,” says Wallace. “It provides the caregiver a sense of security by only waking him up if the individual with dementia is making an attempt to go away the house. “